Christopher A. Wellborn, P.A.
South Carolina Criminal Defense Attorney | Over 25 Years Experience

Call Today | Free Consultation

Christopher A. Wellborn, P.A.
South Carolina Criminal Defense Attorney | Over 25 Years Experience
Call Today | Free Consultation

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Mail fraud: A serious accusation you can defend against

| Jun 5, 2021 | Criminal Defense |

Mail fraud is a serious charge to be accused of, so if you’re faced with allegations, it’s important to get the right support for your case. Mail fraud consists of two elements. These elements are intending to defraud others and using the mail for that purpose.

It is against the law to scheme to get money from others by offering any kind of service, product or investment opportunity that isn’t what you claim it is. For example, stating that you’re going to mail out clothing for a certain price and never intending to send what you said you were selling is a form of fraud. If you make the sale through the mail service, then that turns into mail fraud.

What does the prosecution have to prove in a mail fraud case?

During the case, the prosecution has to show that you intentionally misrepresented your product or services. Additionally, the mail must have been used at some point during that interaction.

Since these are the requirements, someone defending against mail fraud should show that they either did not intend to defraud others or that the mail service was not used during the alleged fraud. For example, if someone accuses you of failing to send a product that they paid for by mail and you can show that you did not receive their payment or that you did send the product to them, then you would have a basis for a defense against their claims.

Our website has more on mail fraud and other fraud charges, so you can prepare to defend yourself against unfair allegations.

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