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South Carolina Criminal Defense Attorney | Over 25 Years Experience

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South Carolina Criminal Defense Attorney | Over 25 Years Experience

Call Today | Free Consultation

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When can your criminal charges be reduced?

On Behalf of | Mar 8, 2022 | Criminal Defense |

If you have been charged with a serious criminal offense, you may want to know if your charges can be reduced. Having your charges reduced means you will be charged with a lesser crime, which will attract a less severe sentence or penalty than the original one you initially faced.

While it is possible to have your charges reduced, there is more to this. It is only in some situations or circumstances that this can happen, and it is all at the discretion of the prosecuting attorney.

Insufficient evidence

If the prosecution does not have enough evidence against you and a conviction is doubtful, they may reduce your charges to a lesser crime where the chances of a guilty verdict are higher. For instance, if the evidence is insufficient to pin you for a DUI, you could end up being charged with reckless driving if the prosecution’s evidence is only enough for that.

Additionally, if you can assist the prosecution in convicting someone else, they could offer you a deal to reduce your charges while at it.

Through a plea bargain

A plea bargain is an agreement between the defense and the prosecution. It involves pleading guilty to lesser charges and accepting the punishment that comes with it rather than risking the outcome of a trial. However, it is advisable not to rush into a plea deal despite the niceties since you may lose out in the end.

It is important to remember that your reduced charges may still carry a considerable sentence, and you could end up in jail. Therefore, avoiding a conviction is in your best interests. Having a solid defense plan is advisable at this stage. It will help you make informed decisions that will ensure your case concludes favorably.

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